Etiwanda surprises Diamond Bar, 33-15

first_imgDIAMOND BAR — There are always bumps in the road on the way back to respectability. Etiwanda High School endured its share of them on Friday night. But the Eagles overcame 138 yards in penalties to upset Diamond Bar High 33-15 in a nonleague contest at Diamond Bar. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 It didn’t look like it on Friday. The Eagles utilized superior team speed to record six plays from scrimmage of 30 yards or longer, not to mention Brandon Fields’ 98-yard kickoff return for a touchdown. Fields didn’t get many touches for the Eagles (2-3), but he made them count. In addition to the kickoff return for a touchdown in the second quarter, his only two first- half runs went for 49 and 59 yards. He also caught one pass for 56 yards. Allyn Fontenot also had a big night for Etiwanda, rushing for 130 yards on 19 carries, including a 69- yard touchdown run. Etiwanda jumped on the board quickly. After the Eagles muffed a punt that allowed Diamond Bar’s opening drive to continue, the Eagles’ Kameron Hamilton intercepted a Jeff Jansen pass at the Etiwanda 15. Six plays later, Fields’ 49-yard scoring run made it 6-0. Both first-year coaches, Etiwanda’s Stephen Bryce and Diamond Bar’s Nick Cuccia, are looking to return their programs to playoff contenders. But coming off an 0-10 season, Etiwanda had much further to go. “This is a big win,’ said Bryce, who was grinning ear to ear. “If I’m not mistaken, they were ranked No. 8 in the Inland Valley.’ center_img Fontenot’s 69-yard run on the opening play of the second quarter doubled Etiwanda’s lead before an 11-yard touchdown pass from David Vazquez to Marvin Jones made it 19-0 less than five minutes later. Just when Diamond Bar finally got something going and scored its first touchdown on a 15-yard Jansen-to-Marcus Marbrey touchdown pass, Fields’ kickoff return proved to be a back-breaker for a 26-7 Etiwanda halftime lead. Jansen threw for 203 yards to lead Diamond Bar, completing 18 of 37 passes. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Acerbi Lazio cant underestimate AC Milan

first_imgLazio defender Francesco Acerbi warned his teammates to not let their guard down against an injury-hit AC Milan sideManager Gennaro Gattuso will be without at least nine members of his squad ahead of Sunday’s Serie A showdown with Lazio.Milan captain Alessio Romagnoli and star striker Gonzalo Higuain are among the absentees for what could be a potentially crucial game for Milan.But Acerbi will not be taking them lightly with Milan just a point behind fourth-place Lazio in the Serie A table.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.“I’ve already talked about it with [Gigio] Donnarumma,” said Acerbi, according to Football-Italia.“The Rossoneri have some important players out with injury, but they still have great quality and they’ll definitely come to Rome to win.“We can’t underestimate Milan, or we risk looking bad.”Sunday’s game will take place at the Stadio Olimpico with kick-off to begin at 18:00 (CET).last_img read more

Aluminumbased electrochemical cell captures and sequesters carbon emissions and generates electricity

first_imgArchitectures of metal/CO2 electrochemical cells as capture systems. Credit: Science Advances 20 Jul 2016: Vol. 2, no. 7, e1600968. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600968 (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at Cornell University has created an aluminum-based electrochemical cell that captures and sequesters carbon emissions while simultaneously generating a large amount of electricity. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Wajdi Al Sadat and Lynden Archer describe the cell, how it works and why they believe it is better than other carbon-capturing cells that have been developed to date. Human beings have been pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere in large amounts since the advent of the industrial age, leading to global warming. Scientists have been working overtime to figure out a way to reduce the amounts of the gas that we emit, but while there have been great improvements, far too much is still going into the air. Meanwhile, other scientists are taking a different approach—they are looking for ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in an economically feasible way. In this new effort, the researchers at Cornell report on cell technology they developed that differs significantly from the approach used by others.To create a cell that removes carbon dioxide, researchers have tried using magnesium, lithium or sodium as an anode—the results to date have worked to some extent, but they produce carbonates, which are not very useful. To get around that problem, the researchers instead used aluminum foil to make the anode—the cathode was made of stainless steel mesh and an ionic liquid with some aluminum chloride salt in it was used as the electrolyte.In testing their cell, the duo found that it was capable of generating up to 13 ampere-hours for every gram of carbon that it captured. They point out that it did so without the need for any sort of catalyst and that it was done at room temperature. In addition, the output from the system consisted of aluminum oxalate, which they noted can be used to make oxalic acid, a material that is commonly used in several industries, which means it could be easily sold.The researchers acknowledge that their cell has one serious drawback at the moment—it won’t work if water is present in the mix of gasses it pulls in, a situation that would exist in most real-world locations. They plan to search for another electrolyte that is less sensitive to moisture to solve that problem. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: The O2-assisted Al/CO2 electrochemical cell: A system for CO2 capture/conversion and electric power generation, Science Advances 20 Jul 2016: Vol. 2, no. 7, e1600968. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600968AbstractEconomical and efficient carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration technologies are a requirement for successful implementation of global action plans to reduce carbon emissions and to mitigate climate change. These technologies are also essential for longer-term use of fossil fuels while reducing the associated carbon footprint. We demonstrate an O2-assisted Al/CO2 electrochemical cell as a new approach to sequester CO2 emissions and, at the same time, to generate substantial amounts of electrical energy. We report on the fundamental principles that guide operations of these cells using multiple intrusive electrochemical and physical analytical methods, including chronopotentiometry, cyclic voltammetry, direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and coupled thermogravimetric analysis–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. On this basis, we demonstrate that an electrochemical cell that uses metallic aluminum as anode and a carbon dioxide/oxygen gas mixture as the active material in the cathode provides a path toward electrochemical generation of a valuable (C2) species and electrical energy. Specifically, we show that the cell first reduces O2 at the cathode to form superoxide intermediates. Chemical reaction of the superoxide with CO2 sequesters the CO2 in the form of aluminum oxalate, Al2(C2O4)3, as the dominant product. On the basis of an analysis of the overall CO2 footprint, which considers emissions associated with the production of the aluminum anode and the CO2 captured/abated by the Al/CO2-O2 electrochemical cell, we conclude that the proposed process offers an important strategy for net reduction of CO2 emissions.last_img read more