Oxigen Wallet to sponsor Sachins Kerala Blasters FC

first_imgMobile wallet service provider Oxigen has partnered with Kerala Blasters Football Club as their official payments solution sponsor. Owned by cricketing legend Sachin Tendulkar, who is also the brand ambassador for Oxigen, the Kerala-based club will compete in the 11-weeks long Indian Super League (ISL). The franchise finished runners-up in the inaugural ISL season last year. “With the launch of ISL, the Indian football landscape has received a major boost to the popularity of the game, global exposure and encouragement to players and aspirant youngsters,” Oxigen Services founder and MD Pramod Saxena said.last_img

Tired of Coffee Try This SprayOn Caffeine Instead

first_img 2 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. January 15, 2014 This story appears in the January 2014 issue of . Subscribe » Entrepreneurs: Ben Yu and Deven Soni, founders of San Francisco-based Sprayable Energy.Bonding at sea: Yu, who studied molecular and chemical biology at Harvard before joining Peter Thiel’s fellowship, and Soni, a venture capitalist, met when they shared a cabin during an entrepreneurs-only expedition to Antarctica in 2011. The duo collaborated on a few projects before developing what they describe as the world’s first caffeine-based topical energy spray.Sprayable EnergyJust a little spritz: “I’m sensitive to caffeine, so I’ve always wanted to find a way to stay energized without having to drink coffee or energy drinks,” says Yu, who gets jittery, then crashes, after drinking a cup of joe. He discussed the idea of sprayable caffeine with his dad, a chemist who studies ways in which substances can be absorbed through the skin. After a year of arduous lab research, Yu and his dad discovered that caffeine’s solubility can be increased by adding a simple derivative of the naturally produced amino acid tyrosine, thus allowing it to be used in spray form.The inventors claim that topically applied caffeine offers a consistent level of energy without the jolting buzz-then-crash that can come from drinking caffeinated beverages. They suggest spraying their product on the neck; four squirts offers about the same effect as a cup of coffee.Building buzz: In August 2013, Yu and Soni created an Indiegogo campaign with the hope of raising $15,000 to produce their product. To their surprise, they ended up reaching their goal within 24 hours of posting it on the crowdfunding site, and within 40 days they had raised $169,862. “We were initially worried that this would be a niche product, but we quickly learned just how many people aren’t satisfied with the current energy products on the market,” Yu says.Cost: The colorless, odorless spray comes packaged in a slim purse- or pocket-size bottle. A two-week supply (40 doses, or 160 sprays) sells for $15 exclusively through Sprayable.co.The goal is to see Sprayable bottles stocked at gas stations and convenience stores.Tireless expansion: Yu is cooking up line extensions, including potentially creating scented versions of the product and offering it in varying concentrations for different energy needs. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

A Drone Unlike Any Youve Ever Seen

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. June 4, 2015 If I saw one of these flying overhead, I’d much sooner duck and call animal control than think I was being surveilled. But this is no living animal.A team of engineering professors at the University of Illinois are working on a fully autonomous drone like you’ve never seen before. It looks and flies just like a living bat. No joke. Bats were the inspiration behind the architecture of these drones because of “their unrivaled agility and maneuverability during flight,” the university says.“When a bat flaps its wings, it’s like a rubber sheet,” professor Seth Hutchinson said on the school’s website. “It fills up with air and deforms. And then when the wing gets to the end of its motion, that rubber wing pushes the air out when it springs back into place. So you get this big amplification of power that comes just from the fact you are using flexible membranes inside the wing itself.”Related: What the Heck Are Drones Good For, Anyway?In other words, it’s a drone that’s equal parts powerful and power efficient. The professors say their bat drones should have longer battery power than traditional quadcopter drones “because of their ability flap and glide instead of relying on constantly rotating propellers.”Take a look at the drones in action. They’re fascinating and, despite the upbeat music in the video, also a little frightening.OK, so people are creating bat drones. Now what? The professors plan on using the bats to monitor progress on construction sites.“Building construction projects are complicated, and rarely do they happen the way they are intended to happen,” Hutchinson said. “Keeping track of whether the building is being put together the right way at the right time is not trivial. So the bats would fly around, pay attention, and compare the building information model to the actual building that’s being constructed.”Related: Senators Push Bill to Legalize Commercial DronesThe professors believe their robo-bats could also someday be used for delivering packages, should such regulations be passed.Between drones that fly like bats and robots that run like cheetahs, well, what’s next? If you don’t believe me about the cheetah thing, see what I mean here. It’s crazy stuff.Related: These Giant Robotic Ants Could One Day Replace Factory Workers 3 min readcenter_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more