Appraising Appraisals

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Appraising Appraisals The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer.  Print This Post Previous: Court of Appeals Rules in Favor of Castle Law Next: Benjamin Carson on HUD: “A Force for Fairness” Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Appraisal Homeowners Prices Sales 2019-04-09 Seth Welborn Sign up for DS News Daily center_img April 9, 2019 820 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Appraisal Homeowners Prices Sales Subscribe Appraising Appraisals Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn Homeowners may be overvaluing their homes compared to appraisals, according to the Quicken Loans’ National Home Price Perception Index (HPPI) for March 2019. THe HPPI stated that the average appraisal was 0.78 percent lower than homeowners expected, widening the gap between homeowners and appraisers more than 50 percent since February.“This month’s fluctuation in the HPPI was driven more by a dip in home values than a change in the owners’ viewpoint. Homeowners are often reluctant to believe their house has lowered in value, even at a slight monthly fluctuation,” said Bill Banfield, EVP of Capital Markets at Quicken Loans. “Depending on the area, appraised values are either growing at a much more measured pace, or have taken a step back from their meteoric rise. Homeowners are usually slower to realize change—in either direction—than the appraisers who study the market on a daily basis. This can lead to a slight widening of the perception gap when there is a turn in the market.”Overall, appraisal values dipped in March month over month. Quicken’s National Home Value Index (HVI) reported appraisal values dipped 0.20 percent from February to March. Regionally, the West saw the biggest increase in home values, up by 0.79 percent. The annual growth ranged from a 2.19 percent year-over-year increase in appraisal values in the West, to a 4.11 percent annual rise the Midwest. According to Quicken, these increases are more modest than we have seen over the last few years, but more in line with inflation and wage growth.“Some of the rampant buyer demand that we’ve seen over the last few years has subsided because of the affordability issues many areas are having, driven by a lack of availability,” said Banfield. “Would-be buyers have decided to sit on the sidelines to see if more home inventory becomes available at the price-points where they’re shopping. The entire housing industry is watching to see what will happen in the coming months—whether owners and builders will provide the home inventory the buyers have been waiting for, amid the recent drop in interest rates.” Share Savelast_img read more

Jerry Garcia Music Arts LLC Launches With Solo “Ripple” Audio & Watercolor Painting

first_imgYesterday was Jerry Day, which celebrated the 76th birthday of Jerry Garcia. To commemorate the Grateful Dead guitarist and his legacy, Garcia family members Keelin Garcia and Manasha Garcia launched a new label named after the legendary musician. Dubbed the Jerry Garcia Music Arts LLC, the organization is “a mission-based company inspired by musician and artist, Jerry Garcia” and will release music and art, with a portion of the proceeds going to charity. As the website notes, Garcia considered himself “an artist, that played music.” And so he continues to live on through both his music and his art.To celebrate the launch of the Jerry Garcia Music Arts LLC, the organization released a limited number of free downloads of Garcia’s solo acoustic “Ripple” from 1982’s Capitol Theater show in Passaic, New Jersey. As the official Jerry Garcia website points out, “Jerry only played one date (early & late shows) solo. Feeling uncomfortable alone on stage, he made sure that [bassist] John Kahn joined him for his next scheduled show. He never played alone on stage again.”Remastered by audio engineer Joe Gastwirt, the one-and-only solo “Ripple” recording was limited to 2,500 free downloads, but will be made available on most digital music services soon for all to enjoy.In addition to the music, the Jerry Garcia Music Arts LLC is offering a limited edition museum quality giclee of Garcia’s watercolor painting, titled “Ripple” as well–going on sale at Terrapin Stationers on August 3rd. According to the organization, a portion of the proceeds from the art piece will support ocean preservation.Check out the watercolor painting, “Ripple” by Jerry Garcia, below. See more art from Jerry Garcia here.For additional information on the Jerry Garcia Music Arts LLC, head to their official website.last_img read more

Translating nine pounds of poetry

first_imgStephen Owen doesn’t understate the intellectual stamina required to maintain a healthy relationship with the Chinese poet Du Fu.“If you’ve got to be stuck with someone for eight years, you want it to be someone you enjoy, who can sustain your interest,” said the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard, who recently published “The Poetry of Du Fu,” the first complete English translation of the great Tang dynasty literary figure.A monumental undertaking (the prolific Du Fu left 1,400 extant poems), Owen spent nearly a decade working on the translation, which resulted in a 3,000-page, six-volume book that weighs in at nine pounds.“I didn’t believe it until I held it in my hand,” he said. “There’s something to having the physical copy.”Owen, a sinologist who has written extensively about Chinese literature, counts “The Poetry of Du Fu” as his 13th published effort, and he expects the substantive book, which is free to download but retails as a hard copy for $210, to find its way into academic libraries and the homes of Chinese-American parents who want their children to grow up familiar with some of the work of the poet, who is considered “the Shakespeare of China.”“This is for general readers and scholars, but mostly for those who know some Chinese, but not enough to read Du Fu. This is to help them,” said Owen.Poetry and commitmentProfessor Stephen Owen reads from “The Poetry of Du Fu,” the first complete English translation of the Chinese poet, which took eight years to complete.Like the Bard of Avon, Du Fu’s writing is layered and shows immense range. The elusive poet wrote in a wide variety of styles and registers. Inside the green-bound volumes are acclaimed verses such as “Moonlit Night” and “View in Spring,” but Owen argues that Du Fu “is a lot more fun when you get out of the well-known ones.” Sitting in his office with shelves and tables stuffed with books, he reflected on the poet’s habit of traveling — always accompanied by all of his poems and his personal library.“He’s a quirky poet. When he moves to Chengdu with his family, he has to set up house and writes a poem to people asking for fruit trees and crockery. No one had ever done this kind of poem. He has a poem praising his bondservant Xinxing for repairing a water-piping system in his house. It’s a wonderful poem about the joy and discoveries of living in the real world instead of living in the rarefied poetic world,” Owen said.Du Fu tackles the subject of war extensively, but there is also a poem about bean sauce and another about taking down a gourd trellis in which Du Fu compares the challenging, if mundane, task to the fall of the Shang dynasty.“He’s forgotten what you can and can’t do in poetry, and 30 years later poets looked back and said, ‘This is the greatest poet we have,’” Owen said.In its simplest form, Chinese poetry is not easy to translate. It doesn’t have tenses and rarely uses pronouns. There is no easy way to tell whether a noun is singular or plural. If the characters read: “bird fly sky,” Owen says, that can be interpreted as either “A bird flies in the sky” or “Birds fly in the sky.”“You read the title — that’s the most important thing,” he said, adding, “Of course, it’s maddening.”Frustrating moments aside, the project was a long-in-the-works dream, born of a 2005 Mellon Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award, which gave Owen $1.5 million to fund this and other projects. “The Complete Poetry of Du Fu” will inaugurate the Library of Chinese Humanities, an accessible series of pre-modern Chinese facing-page texts and translations published by De Gruyter. Owen expected the Du Fu translation to take three years, but teaching responsibilities and speaking engagements set him back numerous times.“It owns you. I got teaching relief for a couple of semesters, and I worked on it and I worked on it. It wasn’t that I was lazy,” he said. “You see the territory that has to be done. You have to plow the south 40, and have plowed the south 28, and see what still has to be done.”Owen, who is 69, worked primarily alone, allowing a graduate student to go over the work only after it was complete.“Du Fu’s a great person to translate, but there goes eight years of your life. Finally it’s done,” he said.last_img read more

Cellular ‘message in a bottle’ may provide path to new way of treating disease

first_img Read Full Story A newly discovered cellular messaging mechanism could lead to a new way to deliver therapeutics to tissues affected by disease, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers found that a type of extracellular vesicle (EV) — a sac secreted by cells that contains proteins and RNA molecules — known as ARMMs also carries receptors that allow signaling without direct contact between cells. This capability may make ARMMs uniquely suited to be engineered to send therapeutics directly to affected areas of the body.“EVs are like messages in a bottle between cells,” said senior author Quan Lu, associate professor of environmental genetics and pathophysiology. “We think that within the next few years, we may be able to swap the endogenous molecules in ARMMs for therapeutic cargos — such as antibodies — and to engineer ARMMs to home in on a particular tissue.”The study was published online Sept. 27, 2017 in Nature Communications.There are an estimated 37 trillion cells in the human body — and 100 times that many EVs. They circulate in the blood and other bodily fluids and are involved in processes such as coagulation and the immune response. They can also be hijacked to spread cancer or viruses like HIV and Ebola.EVs are generating a great deal of interest in the biotechnology field. Researchers believe that the molecules they carry include the fingerprints of disease and harmful environmental exposures. Work is already underway on developing a “liquid biopsy” to test EVs in a drop of blood.Previous work by Lu’s lab described the body’s mechanism for producing ARMMs. Unlike other EVs, which are generated within cells, ARMMs are secreted directly from the plasma membrane at the cell’s surface. Although the physiological function of ARMMs remains unknown, the way that they are made may make them uniquely suited to carry certain molecules.In the current study, the researchers found that ARMMs contain molecules used for NOTCH signaling, a type of intercellular communication that normally requires cell-to-cell contact. NOTCH receptors are plasma membrane proteins involved in critical physiological roles such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell function. According to the new findings, ARMMs are able to facilitate NOTCH receptor signaling at a distance.“Our research on ARMMs has tremendous potential for therapeutics and public health,” Lu said. While other researchers have explored using EVs to deliver therapeutics, directing them within the body has been an obstacle. Lu believes that ARMMs provide a way past that barrier, and he was recently awarded a patent for generating, isolating, and engineering ARMMs. “It will likely be at least 10 years before we see these methods used in a clinical setting,” Lu said. “But the path forward is clear.”  The study’s first author was Qiyu Wang, a research associate at Harvard Chan School.This study was supported in part by a National Institutes of Health R01grant (R01 HL114769) and by funding from the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator Fund.last_img read more