Video: Crumpet loaf “reinventing something basic”

first_imgGreenhalgh’s Craft Bakery spoke to British Baker in an exclusive video interview to talk about their award-winning Crumpet Loaf.The Bolton bakery manufacturer scooped the Product Innovation Award at last year’s Baking Industry Awards, organised by British Baker for its take on the loaf.Bakery manager Stephen Jones said it took between three and four months to develop the concept from start to finish, and up to 40 different mixes were created by the firm before coming up with the final recipe. Speaking about accepting the award last year, Jones said: “It was absolutely fantastic. I have been with the company for 27 years and it was the highlight of my career, because it was just like being at the Oscars.”Read more about Greenhalgh’s success at the Baking Industry Awards 2012 in a future issue of British Baker.Why not enter this year’s Baking Industry Awards. For more information visit www.bakeryawards.co.uk – deadline for entries is Friday 10 May.last_img read more

Marine Biology class travels to Belize over Spring Break

first_imgA Saint Mary’s marine biology class took in-depth learning to a whole new meaning. The class spent spring break in Belize at South Water Caye applying what it learned in the classroom life to the natural world.Saint Mary’s assistant biology professor Laura Kloepper said marine biology had not been taught in years, but the department now plans on regularly running the class.“For the past few years no one has been teaching that class,” Kloepper said. “So we’ve resurrected the marine biology class and we plan on teaching this every two years. This trip to Belize was part of the lab component for our marine biology class that we offer here for majors.”Kloepper said studying Belize was an obvious choice because of its diverse environment. She said it provided a unique opportunity to learn more about a field that is not as prominent in a landlocked state like Indiana.“If you’re teaching marine biology in Indiana doing a lab is a little difficult. So we decided to make our lab one big field trip to Belize where it is a very diverse coral reef ecosystem that’s pretty easy to get to,” Kloepper said. “It’s also one of the few coral reefs that is still fairly unaffected by coral bleaching.”The class went boating in the morning and worked on their individual projects in the afternoon. Kloepper said the students would also go to the reefs in the morning together.“As a class we were doing a marine life census,” Kloepper said. “We are [going to] be sharing those data with an organization in Belize that tracks the organisms across the reefs.”Kloepper said the class spent the afternoon independently studying topics such as coral bleaching, species composition in sea grass beds and hermit crab competition. Senior biology major Casey Moorhead said during the trip the students saw what they learned in the classroom come to life by actually seeing the fish and algae of Belize.“We’ve been learning about fish identification, algae [identification] and we were able to apply what we learned in the class in the field over break,” Moorhead said. “It was nice being able to actually see certain fish and actually say ‘oh that’s a Blue Tang.’”Senior biology major Ally Pudlo said in an email that the class learned about how different organisms interact as well as their roles in the environment.“We learned about the different interactions that occur at the reefs between fish and the corals,” Pudlo said. “We also learned about how vital the mangroves are to the environment and what they provide for the fish and the people.”Moorhead said the main purpose of the trip was for the class to learn first-hand about coral reefs.“Mostly this trip was going out in the field and learning about different composition of the different reefs around there,” Moorhead said.Among the coral reefs they saw, students saw colorful reef fish and larger predators in them, Pudlo said.“We also saw larger fish, like barracudas, and large predators along the reef, like nurse sharks,” Pudlo said.Kloepper said the best way her biology students can learn is by experiencing and dealing with a situation when nothing is going according to plan.“When you’re out in the field doing field work nothing ever goes according to plan,” Kloepper said. “So it was really good for the students to be able to … learn how to adapt their experiments according to these real world scenarios.”Kloepper said her students adapted to field research quickly while facing challenges.“The students became very good field biologists overnight,” Kloepper said. “There was a lot of frustration, but a really important part of science is understanding that those frustrations are natural and learning how to change your experiment based on any challenges that come up.”While there were some frustrations, the students said overall they had a good time. Moorhead said she enjoyed the class’ night snorkel where it saw animals that were only out at night.“We did a night snorkel one night … we were all with our dive lights swimming around the reef and you would look to your left or right and it would just be complete darkness,” Moorhead said. “So we saw an eel, stingrays and then a sea star that opens up at night which was really cool.”A favorite memory for Pudlo was when the class took their last snorkeling class at the Angel Reef.“We enjoyed the beautiful coral reefs, and afterwards we got to swim around in the water and take pictures of each other swimming in the water,” Pudlo said. “This was an incredible trip, and I had a wonderful time with everyone who went on it.” Tags: Belize, coral reefs, lab, saint mary’s, Spring Break, triplast_img read more

Your credit union doesn’t need to jump off the bridge

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Melina Palmer Why do people say one thing and do another? What really drives behavior? How does the brain actually work – and how can we best communicate with it? What does that … Web: www.thebrainybusiness.com Details I am sure that everyone has heard their mother (father, teacher, aunt, uncle, grandparent) say, “If your friends jumped off a bridge would you do that too?” Most often, this question is met with eye-rolls and irritation from the person it was being said to. Or, possibly, a sarcastic remark (something I know nothing about, of course).As a grown up, this dilemma doesn’t go away, and it has a tendency to show up in our work more often than we may realize. For me, this has been incredibly apparent while my team has been eyeball deep in rebranding work. We knew going into this project that it was important for us to stand out and be different from the credit unions and banks in our area – and there are a lot of them in Seattle. I find myself looking at everything we do and have done and ask, “Why?” continually. “Why do we still have check writing stands in our branches?” “Why do people go to our website?” “Why do we have teller lines?”Some of these questions have good answers that coincide with the direction we are going now. Some do not. I have made it my personal mission to eradicate “because that is what the other financial institutions do” from our mindset. What was right yesterday is not necessarily right today, and what the members wanted last week is different from what they will want tomorrow. We need to be prepared for the future and constantly asking ourselves, “Why” (and all of those other “W” words).I came across a quote the other day (probably a Facebook meme or something, I can’t find it again now) but it said something along the lines of, “Just because everyone is doing things one way doesn’t make it right. And, just because no one is doing something doesn’t make it wrong.”With our new branding, we worked with local bands and artists and had them showcase their talents to show what truth means to them (Verity means truth). We essentially handed over our brand to these artists and had to have faith that it would fit us and resonate with our audiences. We only launched last month, but the results so far are promising. This isn’t really a common practice in our industry, and no one is doing anything like this in the Seattle area. Does that mean it is wrong? No. Is it right for everyone? No. Is it the right approach for Verity? Yes.There are still plenty of things we are doing at Verity that we need to examine to see if it is a “because everyone else does it” or “because that is the way we have always done it” item. And, making a commitment to this approach means we are signing on for a way of thinking – this isn’t a project that is ever really “done.” But committing to asking the question means we are committing to being exceptional and really doing what is in the best interest of our membership.Do you take the time to ask “Why?” enough? What are you doing wrong just because everyone else does it? If all the other credit unions decided to jump off of a bridge, would you jump too?last_img read more