Local Authorities Must Take the Lead to Prevent Squatting – Mckenzie

first_img “The municipal corporations will now have to begin to take a much more proactive approach to the question of squatting, and they must now start to take a much greater proactive approach to persons who are building illegally and blocking drains and waterways,” the Minister emphasised. Story Highlights Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Desmond McKenzie, says the island’s local authorities must take the lead in preventing squatter settlements and illegal buildings from mushrooming in their respective municipalities. Minister of Local Government and Community Development, Hon. Desmond McKenzie, says the island’s local authorities must take the lead in preventing squatter settlements and illegal buildings from mushrooming in their respective municipalities.Speaking at a press conference at the St. James Municipal Corporation on November 29, Mr. McKenzie said there are far too many people building houses in areas that are unsuitable for human habitation.“The municipal corporations will now have to begin to take a much more proactive approach to the question of squatting, and they must now start to take a much greater proactive approach to persons who are building illegally and blocking drains and waterways,” the Minister emphasised.“What we need is the will to execute the laws that are presently on the books that speak to the question of illegal building, that speak to the question of squatting and that speak to the question of how you dispose of your garbage,” he added.Mr. McKenzie said come January 2018, his Ministry will bring all relevant stakeholders together across the country to conduct a rapid assessment of squatting and illegal buildings, and to come up with strategies for remedying the issues.“This collective force that we are bringing together will form a core of what the new Building Bill that was passed in the House is calling for – to seriously look at the no-build zones and to look at how people build,” he said.“If the law is to be effective, and if it is to change the face of how we do business as it relates to building, we have to be in a position to enforce the Regulations that have been passed as they relate to the Building Bill,” the Minister said.The Minister said public education has to be a critical part of the focus of the local authorities next year, especially due to the recent and imminent changes in weather patterns.He said the situation requires an “open response” from residents and a change in attitudes, as, if there is no change, despite the funding disbursed by the Government and any disaster mitigation works undertaken by the State, the problems will recur.“We have not had this amount of rain for the last 30 years… . In some communities in Clarendon, we witnessed rainfall of over 10 inches within a short period of time,” he pointed out.“Outside of what the climate is doing, there is also the human side, which is of grave concern to the Government. Regardless of how much money we provide for clean-up, and regardless of how many drains we clean, if there is not a change in attitude, then we are going to be back here in a short time saying the same thing,” he said. Mr. McKenzie said come January 2018, his Ministry will bring all relevant stakeholders together across the country to conduct a rapid assessment of squatting and illegal buildings, and to come up with strategies for remedying the issues.last_img read more

Leonardo DiCaprio Continues Efforts To Protect Endangered Vaquita

first_imgLast month, during a meeting between President Enrique Peña Nieto, Leonardo DiCaprio, Carlos Slim, and senior government officials at the Official Residence of Los Pinos, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed agreeing to make major commitments to protect valuable marine ecosystems in the Gulf of California.This effort is backed by both the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and the Carlos Slim Foundation, as they will support the Mexican Government’s ongoing efforts to achieve the major marine conservation goals described in the MOU.The MOU represents a collaboration between the government, NGOs, and the local communities working to ensure the ongoing vitality of the region’s waters – which have been under increasing pressure from overfishing. This activity has resulted in devastating impacts on marine life – for example, driving the native vaquita to the brink of extinction. There are fewer than 30 of the native porpoises left in the wild.The MOU sets out specific objectives aimed at stemming illegal fishing and protecting marine life, including the remaining vaquita:• Making the temporary ban on the use of gillnets throughout the range of the vaquita in the upper Gulf of California waters permanent, • Improving enforcement efforts to combat the use of illegal gillnets and increasing prosecution of illegal fishing and totoaba poaching, • Prohibiting nighttime fishing in the upper Gulf of California and the vaquita Reserve, and • Implementing and enforcing limited entry and exit points throughout the region for all fishing through certified inspectors.The MOU also includes a commitment to work with local communities on a plan to promote the adoption of more sustainable fishing practices, accelerate the development of gillnet replacement gear that does not endanger the native vaquita and several large fish species, continue to evaluate the feasibility of providing sanctuary to the remaining vaquitas, and establish an international expert advisory committee to provide input on the content of the MOU and to develop an action plan over the next several months.These actions outlined in the MOU complement previous efforts led by the Mexican Government during the administration of President Peña Nieto, which has shown a profound willingness to save the vaquita species.“Mexico understands its responsibility as one of the countries with greatest biodiversity,” said President Peña Nieto. “That is why we have implemented an historic effort to avoid the extinction of a unique species in the world and also to protect important ecosystems such as the Revillagigedo World Heritage Site. Mexico also understands its vulnerability to the effects of climate change, and that is why we committed to meet the commitments of the Paris Agreement and to work with other countries to do the same. We are very pleased to have the support of the DiCaprio Foundation and the Slim Foundation since the sum of effort and teamwork always brings better results.”Working alongside national governments and local communities to foster greater conservation action is a key focus of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, which has been in constant communication with the Mexican Government for weeks in an effort to obtain major commitments.“Now more than ever, the world is looking for bold leadership at every level to tackle climate change and environmental conservation issues,” said Mr. DiCaprio. “I am honored to work with President Peña Nieto, who has been a leader in ecosystem conservation, to ensure the future viability of marine life in the Gulf. This action is a critical step towards ensuring that the Gulf of California continues to be both vibrant and productive, especially for species like the critically endangered vaquita. My Foundation and I look forward to continuing to work with President Peña Nieto, our NGO partners, and the local communities in the Gulf to reach greater progress on these important issues.”Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and the Carlos Slim Foundation have pledged to support the ongoing operation of the enforcement, research, and implementation of the MOU objectives.“The efforts embraced by the government of Mexico towards the maintenance and preservation of the environment, as well as the relentless work by universities, NGOs and philanthropic organizations have been significant,” said Carlos Slim. “Today, we join with the government and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, along with several NGOs, for what could be the last opportunity to rescue and preserve the vaquita marine mammal. Despite the efforts and investments implemented to save them – their population has dramatically declined, sadly, as victims trapped by illegal fishing gillnets.”This effort is supported by local and international conservation groups, including Pronatura Noroeste, World Wildlife Fund, Sea Shepherd, and Marisla Foundation – who stressed that this model of cooperation is key to achieving success on critical conservation issues.Gustavo D. Danemann, Executive Director of Pronatura Noroeste, a leading non-profit group in northwest Mexico, expressed his support towards the new commitments, “Pronatura Noroeste is committed to continuing to work to save the vaquita in close collaboration with the Mexican government, organizations and local communities. We are encouraged by this recent announcement which signals a renewed sense of hope that we can turn things around for the vaquita.”“The vaquita are facing imminent extinction unless immediate and drastic action is taken,” said Herbert M. Bedolfe, Executive Director Marisla Foundation. “Together, we are committed to these actions and the recovery of the vaquita population.”“This agreement is a significant step toward saving the vaquita from extinction. It will require collective action to protect this unique piece of Mexico’s heritage and secure a healthy Upper Gulf of California for wildlife and local communities alike,” said Jorge Rickards, acting CEO of WWF-Mexico. “Banning the use of deadly gillnets offers a lifeline to vaquita, though our work doesn’t end here. We look forward to ensuring full implementation of these commitments and a clear and immediate path forward for local fishing communities.”last_img read more

Models use closed Facebook groups to identify sexually inappropriate photographers

first_img Twitter Drew Catherine has had countless uncomfortable encounters with photographers in her three years working as a freelance model in Toronto.“I had one photographer who reached up and just outright started touching me,” she said. “I’ve had photographers ask me to participate in sexual things with them while they take photos.”She also said, “I’ve almost been locked in a bank vault.” Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook The 22-year-old said stories from other Toronto-based models are “heart-wrenching” and speak of “rape, of abuse, photographers selling their images without permission, taking photos of them in dressing rooms.”Catherine, who often poses semi-nude, was so fed up with the constant harassment — as well as photographers withholding photos or not paying her — that she started the Facebook group Toronto-Ontario Photographer Reviews.Its tagline: “Safety comes first!”READ MORE Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more