The Long View

first_img First Heatwave Expected Next Week People The Long View Article and Photo courtesy of Caltech Published on Monday, January 11, 2016 | 4:20 pm Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Make a comment Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Business News More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Subscribe Top of the News Straight Line to the Capitol: France Córdova at her apartment in Washington, D.C., overlooking Arlington National Cemetery and the National Mall.In 2014, France Córdova (PhD ’79) was confirmed as the 14th director of the National Science Foundation, the culmination of more than three decades in science, technology, and academic leadership roles. We spoke with the Distinguished Alumna (’07) about her remarkable career, the advancement of women in academia, and her enthusiasm for the future of science.How did you first become interested in science?Growing up, I was always fascinated by science. In high school, I remember learning that Charlie Townes (PhD ’39) had invented the maser. I was riveted. But there was no encouragement in my family or mentorship from my teachers to pursue a career in science. In fact, my mother expected that I would get what she called an MRS degree: Meet somebody, get married, and raise the children. That was just the expectation of the times.Your entry to Caltech wasn’t exactly the typical path. How did you get started?I found my way to Gordon Garmire, a physicist who is best known for his work in high-energy astronomy instrumentation and the diffuse X-ray background. He gave me a job, not as a graduate student but writing computer programs to analyze data. Once again, if it meant getting my foot in the door, I said yes. Then I asked if I could audit courses. I did all the required tests, was graded, and—I think to the surprise of the faculty—did really well. So they decided to admit me as a graduate student in physics.Caltech was a rigorous, collaborative, and fun environment. As graduate students, you were able to learn from and work right alongside all of these incredible minds, like theoretical physicists Murray Gell-Mann and Richard Feynman. You take it for granted when you’re a student. There was also an experimental, bootstrap, hands-on atmosphere. I remember once nearly electrocuting myself at White Sands while scaling up the framework of a rocket in the middle of a lightning storm, all to put some duct tape on an instrument. I have a feeling they wouldn’t allow that now, but that was the kind of place Caltech was. You could do theoretical work and also get your hands involved with experimentation.What do you feel contributed to your success?I can’t say there was ever a strategy. Part of it was that when an opportunity came, I wasn’t afraid of it. I never considered a lack of experience to be a serious obstacle. If you’re going to a job that has bigger authority, you almost never have all the required experience.I’ve never felt that I deserved something. Rather, I consider it a privilege to be a part of the various universities and federal agencies that I’ve served, and to be able to contribute to the culture of science and engineering.last_img read more

Onsite: Day one at The Financial Brand Forum 2016 – Las Vegas

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Details The Financial Brand Forum has quickly become a must attend event for credit union and bank marketers and anyone interested in marketing, advertising, branding and retail delivery over the past four years. The Forum was specifically designed to help credit unions and banks tackle their biggest branding, marketing and retail delivery challenges. This year over 1000 people have made their way to Las Vegas for the event.Highlights from day one:“Creativity is a muscle. The more you use it, the stronger it gets.” Jeffrey Pilcher, founder and CEO of The Financial Brand“Manage the culture of your business and the culture will manage your business.” Arkadi Kuhlman, CEO of ZenBanx and founder of ING Direct“75% of consumers are on social media. Be where your customers are.” Jim Marous, co-publisher of The Financial Brand“Everyone one of us can be disruptors.” Luvleen Sidhu, CMO of BankMobile“It takes 6 months for a new employee before the culture of the new company outweighs the culture of their old job.” Garrick Throckmorton, AVP/Organizational Development at Allegacy FCU“You can’t nickel and dime millennials with banking. Be transparent and upfront on fees and cost.” Jason Falls, SVP Digital Strategy at Elasticity“People care more about their relative wealth, than absolute wealth.” Shankar Vedantam, social science correspondent at NPR and the author of The Hidden BrainFollow all the happening today at The Financial Brand Forum in Las Vegas on Twitter at #FBForum.last_img read more

Shirley Marie Church

first_imgShirley Marie Church, 93, of Indianapolis, died on October 17, 2018. She was born on May 4, 1925 in Aurora, IL to the late Camile and Bessie (Covalt) Bernard. She lived for several years in Osgood, IN. Shirley was a member of the St. Lawrence Catholic Community as well as the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is survived by her sons, Charles, James, Daniel and Joseph Church; daughters, Marie Church and Rebecca (Buzz) Church-Bodell; 4 grand-children; two sisters, Catherine Korra and Marion Pieczko. She was preceded in death by her husband of 42 years, Edward A. Church and parents. Visitation will be held on Sunday, October 21 from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at Legacy Cremation & Funeral Services – Lawrence, 5215 N. Shadeland Ave., Indianapolis with a Prayer Vigil at 3:30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will take place Monday, October 22 at 10:00 a.m. with visitation one-hour prior at St. Lawrence Catholic Church, 4650 Shadeland Ave., Indianapolis. Burial will follow at St. John Cemetery in Osgood, IN with a 1:00 p.m. graveside service. Neal’s Funeral Home of Osgood will be in charge of the committal service. Memorial contributions in memory of Mrs. Church can be made to the St. Vincent de Paul Society or for Masses. Envelopes will be available at both the funeral home and the church. To leave a condolence for the family please visit www.legacycremationfuneral.com.last_img read more