CERN Teases Larger More Powerful Particle Collider

first_imgStay on target Large Hadron Collider Shut Down For 2-Year Upgrade While the world’s largest, most powerful particle collider remains closed for spring cleaning, scientists are turning their attention to a new toy.The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) on Tuesday published a report examining the design of an even larger, more powerful potential successor: the Future Circular Collider.CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a reliable friend to particle physicists since its launch in 2010—providing unprecedented insights into incomprehensibly small particles. (Ever heard of the Higgs boson?)But there’s a huge world of tiny particles just waiting to be discovered.A scientific collaboration this week released a concept design for the Future Circular Collider (FCC), a new experiment that would sit inside a 62-mile tunnel under Geneva.“The FCC conceptual design report is a remarkable accomplishment,” CERN Director General Fabiola Gianotti said in a statement. “It shows the tremendous potential of the FCC to improve our knowledge of fundamental physics and to advance many technologies with a broad impact on society.”Expected to serve the global physics community for 15 to 20 years, the large circular electron-positron collider will likely cost somewhere in the ballpark of €9 billion ($10 billion).The machine could begin operations in the late 2050s, according to CERN.“The FCC timeline foresees starting with an electron-positron machine, just as LEP preceded the LHC,” Frédérick Bordry, CERN director for accelerators and technology, revealed. “This would enable a rich program to benefit the particle physics community throughout the 21st century.”Using high-field superconducting magnets, the FCC proton collider would offer a wide range of new physics opportunities—including deeper insight into the Higgs boson, or “God particle.”Learn more about the Future Circular Collider in this 18-page FAQ.It took CERN 10 years to build the largest machine in the world: The LHC lies some 574 feet beneath the France-Switzerland border near Geneva, where scientists test predictions of particle physics theories.Following its first data-taking period from 2010 to 2013, the accelerator was taken offline and upgraded over two years, restarting again in early 2015 for a second research run.Operators last month turned off the machine again, ending a “very successful” sequence, in which it collected more than 300 million gigabytes of data (about 1,000 years of 24/7 video streaming).Proton beams will resume in spring 2021, with the LHC’s third run.More on Geek.com:Scientists Prank CERN With Fake Human SacrificeLarge Hadron Collider Shuts Down, Weasel to BlameChina Set to Build Particle Collider Twice the Circumference of LHClast_img

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