Norton apologises to Parliament 2 months later

first_img…regrets inaccurately saying NEW GPC was paid to store drugs during the pre-qualification periodMore than two months after he was found to have misled the National Assembly, Minister of Public Health, Dr George Norton has finally apologised to the House over his remarks which had purported that Government had paid the New Guyana Pharmaceutical Corporation (GPC) in excess of $19 million for the storage of drugs and medical supplies.Public Health Minister, Dr George NortonA repentant Public Health Minister used the occasion of ‘Statements by a Minister’ to offer the apology to the President, Prime Minister, Speaker and other members of the National Assembly when the House came out of its annual recess and convened on Thursday.The apology was however informally rejected by sections of the political opposition, some of whom heckled that he was in fact encouraged by Prime Minister, Moses Nagamotoo to make the misleading statements, in addition to offering a ‘Donald Trump’ apologyIn offering his apologies, Dr Norton told the House, “as Minister of Public Health, I know the high standard of duty and care expected of me and the staff of Ministry, I take fully the responsibility for this unfortunate episode and give my full commitment that it will not re-occur.”Recalling the genesis of the sordid state of affairs—for which the political opposition had threatened sanctions—Dr Norton drew reference to the House’s consideration of the Financial Papers on Monday 8 August, 2016, where he was questioned extensively by the political opposition.According to the Public Health Minster, “in the process I gave answers that were in some parts based on personal knowledge and ability and in other parts based on information and advice presented to me.”He conceded that “since that day I have come to the firm position that the answers given to two questions relating to the payment to NEW GPC and for the storage of drugs in the bond at 29 Sussex Street were not accurate, as these were based on information supplied to me.”Following the inaccurate disclosures by Dr Norton, it was revealed that the ministry did not pay NEW GPC one cent for the storage of drugs and medical supplies during the pre-qualification period.Dr Norton had also told the House that the ministry at the time had already begun utilising the Sussex Street building the Ministry was renting for in excess of $12.5M monthly, but this turned out not to be the case, since the building had not been completed at the time.That Sussex Street, Georgetown, building was discovered to be owned by Linden Holding Inc, whose principal was one of the coalition Government’s key financiers, Larry Singh, and was further not deemed to be adequate for the storage of the nation’s drugs and medical supplies.Head of State David Granger subsequently ordered an investigation of the transaction by a Cabinet Sub-committee which found that the contract should in fact be renegotiated since the rental fee was deemed to be too high, in addition to other concerns raised.Minister Norton in appealing to the National Assembly said in the circumstances he wishes to “express my sincere and profound regret…”last_img read more

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VP Boakai Wants ‘Critical Views’ Respected

first_imgVice President Joseph Boakai says if leaders allow their people to speak frankly and earnestly, it is unlikely that they will plan evil against their government.“They may not always be our friends, they may not always say what we want to hear, but I know that when people speak frankly and earnestly, they do not go back to plan evil because they have said what they wanted to say,” VP Boakai noted.He made the assertion Sunday, June 8 when he spoke at the first anniversary of the Tom Kamara Foundation (TKF), and the launch of the Foundation’s Lecture Series held at the Mamba Point Hotel in Monrovia.The late Kamara was the Managing Editor of the New Democrat Newspaper. He died in June 2012 following a brief illness in Holland.VP Boakia noted, “In an earnest way we should respect their views, but the underlining thing about what you say and what you do is to say the truth in the interest of the nation.” “Because you know very well that no matter what you say or do, you must be harming the country and we want to be in a country where leaders would know that they are called to leadership to serve their people,” VP Boakai noted.Vice President Joseph Boakai commended staffs of the New Democrat newspaper for what he considered “Keeping the dreams of Kamara alive.”Making remarks earlier, human right lawyer, Cllr. Tiawon Gongloe said that Kamara’s dream was to use his pen to expose and eliminate corruption in the country, but unfortunately he could not live to accomplish the objective.Explaining about the lecture series, Cllr. Gongloe said, it would provide platform where individuals will discuss critical issues which he considers “unspeakable.” “The lecture series will not window dress and whitewash; it would highlight critical issues that people don’t want to hear. This was Tom’s vision and mission for Liberia,” the human rights lawyer emphasized.  “Tom did not hate anyone, but his love for Liberia was above every other thing in his life time,” he added.Cllr. Gongloe also said “If Tom were asked to choose among his family, friends and Liberia, he would rather choose his country.”According to the human right lawyer, writing an article against the wrong government did does not mean he hated government, but demonstration of love for his country.“Many of us were advocates that came to government, but he took his pen to monitor us and to keep us on our heel to do the right thing,” Gongloe noted.  He continued, “That was what he demonstrated and people thought he hated them. Tom was an individual who stood up for the truth.”  Mrs. Rachael Kamara, widow and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Foundation, described her late husband as a “remarkable journalist.”She stressed that her husband was not only a remarkable journalist, but also an outstanding social advocate, who stood for protection of free speech, freedom of the press and promotion of human rights.Giving an overview of her foundation, Mrs. Kamara said, it has helped to build capacity of high school students, basically in the area of Journalism.“We have taught them the rudiments of Journalism by organizing them into a press club, which we expect to expand in the future, when we have the needed funding,” Mrs. Kamara disclosed.She named the William V.S. Tubman High School, Paynesville Community High School, D. Tweh High, True Vine Institute, Mohammed Salim Baktit, Bishop L. J. Barnes and M.J. Nuah High Schools as institutions where students are benefiting from her foundation’s activities.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Orona enters semis

first_img“Finally, all the hard work paid off,” Orona said. “I just went out there and wrestled my best. “I just went into the quarterfinals confident. I knew what I could do, and I went out and did it.” • Audio: Whittier – CIF wrestling finals BAKERSFIELD – at Rabobank Arena, wrestled his way into today’s semifinals in the 119-pound weight class. Orona scored a technical fall over Vista’s Chris Escobar in the second round and survived an overtime thriller in the third round before scoring a major decision with an easy 13-1 victory over Del Oro’s Corey Johnson in the quarterfinals. The win over Gilroy’s Martin Gonzalez in the second round, which he earned with a takedown in overtime for a 3-1 victory, was all about will. “I just went in there thinking that I didn’t want to lose,” Orona said. “I just kept on wrestling the whole match.” But it wasn’t easy. Gonzalez got the edge late in the second period with an escape for a 1-0 lead. But Orona countered with his own escape with 1:33 left in regulation before getting the takedown and the win with five seconds left in overtime. “I just tried to finish,” Orona said. “I knew I couldn’t stop, otherwise I lose. I’m just thinking, `Keep on going, keep on going.’ I kept on (wrestling), and I got the escape and then (later the win).” center_img He now faces No. 1-ranked Nikko Triggas of Campolino in the semifinals this morning. It’s a match Orona is looking forward to. “I’m happy to see (him) in the semifinals,” Orona said. “He’s No. 1 in the nation. It should be a very exciting match.” Williams, who advanced to the finals at 103 pounds last season, is happy to get another shot at today’s semifinals and finals. “I feel good,” said Williams, ranked No. 1 in the state at 112 pounds. “I felt bad after losing (at CIF-SS divisionals), but I’m beyond that. I’m in the semis, and I have a really tough match, so I’m looking towards that.” Williams advanced with a pair of technical falls in the second and third rounds before scoring a 5-2 win over San Leandro’s Markjay Acosta. He faces Bakersfield’s Nextoe Demison in the semifinals. “I just have to take them one at a time and focus on winning the semifinals,” Williams said. The first day of the CIF State Wrestling Championships was especially gratifying for Santa Fe High School’s Marcus Orona on Friday. Orona, who brought a No. 2 state ranking into this weekend’s event. Other wrestlers of note who advanced to the semifinals include South Hills’ Thomas Williams (112), San Dimas’ Angel Garcia (119) and Rosemead’s Anthony Gonzalez (heavyweight). All three have clinched at least a sixth-place finish. steve.ramirez@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3061 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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Exclusive – Irvine not happy with balance of West Brom squad as he eyes more signings

first_imgWest Bromwich Albion boss Alan Irvine admits he is still not happy with the balance of his squad ahead of the opening weekend of the Premier League season.The Baggies, who kick off their campaign against Sunderland at the Hawthorns on Saturday, have made eight signings over the summer, with £10m striker Brown Ideye among the new arrivals.Irvine, though, is keen to take the number of additions into double figures, telling the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast: “We are still working on the balance. When I came in, the squad had no full-backs and no wide players, with the exception of Chris Brunt, who is not a natural winger but a wide midfield player, or someone who plays narrower.“We are still working on the wide players and we would still like to bring in another striker if we could, but it is extremely difficult completing deals at the moment.”Irvine, who replaced Pep Mel in the Baggies’ hot-seat in June, is set to hand Ideye his debut against the Black Cats, despite knowing next to nothing about the player.The Nigerian barely featured in pre-season after seeing his switch from Dynamo Kiev held up by red tape, and Irvine freely admits he had little say in the 25-year-old’s arrival.“I’m somebody who would always like to watch players before they come in, but we have a different system here,” he said.“My title is head coach, not manager, so that is more of a foreign approach. I am perfectly comfortable with that system. It doesn’t mean I’m not involved in the decisions on whether we sign players or whether we let players go, but it is not the same involvement you might have if you were the manager.”last_img read more

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Spurs midfielder says Southgate speech was a turning point point for England

first_img Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Eric Dier says Gareth Southgate’s post-World Cup rallying cry has worked wonders for England.The Three Lions beat Croatia 2-1 in their final Nations League group game to seal a place in next year’s semi-final, pipping Spain to top spot in the process. huge blow Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade It keeps alive England’s hopes of lifting major silverware for the first time since the World Cup triumph in 1966 when they face Switzerland, the Netherlands or Portugal next June.And Tottenham midfielder Dier, who played in Nations League victories over Croatia and Spain, has credited manager Southgate for England’s consistent form following their World Cup semi-final exit at the hands of the Croats in the summer.“The next camp was quite quickly after the World Cup and the manager made it clear we could go in two different directions,” Dier explained.“He said we could settle for what we had done at the World Cup or continue to build something special – we have taken that route. shining Most Popular Football News MONEY Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade England manager Gareth Southgate has overseen the national side’s progress to the semi-final 2 REVEALED 2 Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ ADVICE RANKED Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? BEST OF “Hopefully we can continue to do that and everyone is on board with doing that. We want to continue to get better and we believe we can still get a lot better as well.“That atmosphere [on Sunday] was the best I have had playing for the national team at Wembley by far and I think to be honest, after the World Cup that is the kind of atmosphere we deserve here and we got that and hopefully it can continue to be like that.“It was a fantastic feeling at the end of the game between us and the fans and hopefully we can continue to play football that the fans come to watch and get them off their seats.“It works both ways – we need to give and they need to give and hopefully we can continue to build a special relationship.” no dice REVEALED Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury Getty Eric Dier has been a permanent fixture in England’s midfield since the World Cup REPLY last_img read more

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Jakks to use TV screen for reading

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! MALIBU – To get kids into reading, Jakks Pacific Inc. will try to get them to watch more television. The toy maker has found significant sales success with its TV games consoles, adapting popular children’s characters into video games that plug directly into televisions. Now, it’s adapting the technology to make interactive books that appear on TV screens. The company said Monday that it has forged a licensing deal with Scholastic Media to add its preschool titles “Clifford The Big Red Dog” and “I-SPY” to the Tell-A-Story line. After plugging the consoles into televisions, children can either read the stories aloud themselves or have the console read it to them, with interactive animation elements interspersed throughout the story line. “We really saw the need out there for a fun and educational book,” said Anson Sowby, director of marketing for Jakks. “A lot of parents told us they loved educational products, but at the end of the day, they were loving it a lot more than their kids did. This is an attempt to foster a love for learning by the kids, too.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals The systems will begin selling in mass retailers, toy stores and book shops in August, with a price of $29.99 for the console and between $9.99 and $14.99 for the books. “There’s still value to a paper book and for one child, that might be the ultimate learning experience,” said Cheryl Gotthelf, vice president of brand marketing and television broadcast relations for Scholastic. “For another, they might not sit still until the end, but they could tap into a whole new way of learning with this.” Brent Hopkins, (818) 713-3738 brent.hopkins@dailynews.com last_img read more

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Would the other Charles Ward please come to court?

first_imgAn Arranmore islander claimed in court that he never received a fixed penalty notice as the letter had gone to his cousin of the same name.Charles Ward, of Leagbarrow Upper appeared at Letterkenny District Court charged with having no NCT on his vehicle. He told the court that he lives in Drumkeen with his wife and children during the school year but lives on Arranmore in the summer months.He was stopped by Gardai at Pearse Road in Letterkenny where it was found that he was not wearing a seatbelt and his NCT on his Audi car had expired.Mr Ward said the first time he had been told of the fixed penalty was when his cousin, known as Charlie Ward, had returned from being in America in November and opened all his mail.He said if he had personally received a summons then he would have paid it.Judge Paul Kelly ordered the accused man’s solicitor Donagh Kelly to have the other Mr Ward in court on July 19th to explain the situation.Would the other Charles Ward please come to court? was last modified: July 13th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arranmore IslandCharles WardcourtdonegalGardailast_img read more

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Warriors-Rockets series largely hinges on whose math formula works best

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – As the Houston Rockets have clanked repeatedly from 3-point range, the Warriors have felt further validated with their offensive system.On the surface, it appears the Warriors’ offense relies on Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson making shots. The Warriors believe they maximize those scorers by emphasizing quality passes, sharp cutting and …last_img

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The Mind-Body Problem Has Not Been Solved by Naturalism

first_imgSeveral news stories bring back the issue of mind-body dualism with a vengeance.Hospital Finds Nothing but Air Where Part of Patient’s Brain Should Be (Breitbart News). Some people get accused of being airheads, but this case is real. Nate Church reports, “The remarkable cause of an 84-year-old man’s numerous minor symptoms when he came to the emergency room shocked his doctors.”It is not unusual for a man of such advanced years to experience muscle weakness or loss of balance, nor is it especially notable for them to suffer falls. But when the frequency of all three became concerning, the unnamed Irishman came to Causeway Hospital in Coleraine, Northern Ireland, for answers.Dr. Finlay Brown recalls the unique experience: “He was otherwise fit and well, independent with physical activities of daily living … and lived at home with his wife and two sons.” But after a CAT scan and MRI, it became immediately apparent that the man’s case was almost unprecedented; there was nothing but empty space where a large part of his brain should have been.Most of the patient’s right frontal lobe was instead an empty pocket of air.Can you think with air instead of brain tissue? Undoubtedly not, but this case illustrates the extreme plasticity of the brain to survive major trauma. Apparently a bone tumor in his sinuses created an opening like a one-way valve into his skull. Every time he sneezed or coughed, it pumped air into his brain. This went on for years until he was examined.Logic in babies (Justin Halberda in Science Magazine). New evidence shows that infants as young as 12 months possess the rudiments of logical thinking. A new paper by Cesana-Arlotti et al. in the same issue of Science, “Precursors of logical reasoning in preverbal human infants,” shows that “one essential form of logical inference, process of elimination, is within the toolkit of 12-month-old infants,” Halberda says. This leads to deep philosophical questions:Every scientific method requires a supporting logic. For Francis Bacon, this was unfettered empirical observation followed by induction (reasoning from many cases to form a general principle). Karl Popper stressed the importance of hypothesis testing and the ability to refute hypotheses found to be false (science as an extended instance of process of elimination). And Thomas Kuhn highlighted the dramatic changes that occur during scientific revolutions, in which wholly new models of phenomena are created through model building and abduction (sometimes called “inference to the best explanation”). Examples of such revolutions are the Copernican Revolution producing the heliocentric model of the solar system, and the Einsteinian Revolution of special relativity in which space and time become one. In each of these cases (induction, hypothesis testing, abduction), the work of science is supported by an underlying logic. No logic, no science.If infants possess rudiments of logical thinking, where did it come from? The latest paper adds to growing evidence of logical foundations in infancy, which is quite astonishing. “After all, it often feels like logical reasoning is effortful, conscious, and even linguistically based,” Halberda remarks. “These characteristics, if accurate, would seem to preclude the possibility that preverbal infants could engage in any such process.” Even without language, however, Cesana-Arlotti et al. showed with experiments that infants would express confusion or delight if objects were hidden and revealed in illogical or logical ways.Potentially even more exciting, infants also showed signs of making the necessary inferences along the way—for example, upon seeing which of the two objects was behind the wall, but before the cup’s contents were revealed, infants’ pupils dilated and they tended to shift their fixation to the cup (consistent with them inferring which object must be inside). This pattern suggests that infants used the information they had seen to reason through a disjunctive syllogism (A or B, not A, therefore B). There were also additional versions of these vignettes that manipulated the precise sequence of hiding and revealing, which allowed the authors to determine what specifically the infants were remembering and expecting during each moment.This is all pre-verbal inference, supporting the idea that logic is conceptual in nature and not dependent on language. Experiments with dogs and other animals show that they lack this kind of logical inference. Halberda concludes, “It is a thrilling time for us as scientists—using logical reasoning to understand how we reason logically.” He makes no attempt to explain how Darwinian evolution might have brought this about. See also the Science Daily summary of the experimental procedures and findings.Ravens, Crows, Parrots, and More—Meet the Most Intelligent Birds (National Geographic). In the previous article, Halberda stated, “The race to document the range of early logical abilities shared by infants, adults, and nonhuman animals, and to determine how these foundational abilities empower our broader capacities to reason, has begun.” But is there a difference between human and non-human logical ability? In this National Geographic article, Amelia Stymacks discusses bird brains, long subjected to ridicule, which are no bigger than a nut and presumably stupid. She discusses the smartest of the birds: ravens, crows, parrots and cockatoos, stating, “Their brains may be tiny, but birds have been known to outsmart children and apes.”  Other “sleeper” birds like grackles, orioles and blackbirds might turn out to be brainier than thought.Bird intelligence seems to consist of puzzle-solving skill, such as the ability to make a tool to obtain food. Even chimps fail at some of the tests corvids and parrots solve. Birds are certainly impressive in their ability to navigate, signal, solve puzzles and remember things, but is this the same as logical reasoning? Stymacks doesn’t say. She also doesn’t explain how such abilities could have evolved, nor why small-brained birds should perform better than larger-brained chimpanzees. Scientists also cannot determine if any nonhuman animal is capable of abstract thought, morality (see 11 March 2018) or a logical chain of inference.Study tackles neuroscience claims to have disproved ‘free will’ (Medical Xpress). Materialists have made much of old experiments that seemed to deny the existence of human free will. This quote from North Carolina State University gives a cogent counter-argument, pointing out along the way the need for critical thinking before accepting claims. Incidentally, reasoning about this debate requires free will, doesn’t it?For several decades, some researchers have argued that neuroscience studies prove human actions are driven by external stimuli—that the brain is reactive and free will is an illusion. But a new analysis of these studies shows that many contained methodological inconsistencies and conflicting results.“Score one for skepticism of claims that neuroscience has proven—or disproven—any metaphysical position,” says Veljko Dubljevic, co-author of the paper and an assistant professor of philosophy at NC State who specializes in research on the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience and technology.“The problem is that neuroscientists in training are being taught these studies provide definitive proof of the absence of free will, and instructors aren’t being careful about looking at the evidence that supports the claims that are made,” Dubljevic says. “Teaching uncritical thinking like this in science courses is both unscientific and socially dangerous.”Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that integrates head motion with visual signals (University College London). We tend to think that following motion depends just on our eyes, but we also must process information about our own position. A context-dependent process in the brain integrates signals from the eyes and ears so that we know which way to turn our heads.As you go about daily life you are constantly moving your head to look around the world. In order to make sense of the information that falls within your gaze you need to keep track of the position of your head; this is accomplished with information that comes from your vestibular sense organs, which are in your inner ears. The research team identified a site in the primary visual cortex (area V1) where vestibular signals and visual signals converge and went on to determine that the vestibular signals come from the retrosplenial cortex, a brain area thought to encode information critical for spatial navigation through the surrounding world.Think of how quickly this occurs. When you hear a gunshot and turn your head to look where it came from, signals from several areas must travel in a finite time, converge, and be processed in that brief moment. “Perhaps the most surprising observation was the extent to which these signals were being represented across the local network,” Professor Troy W. Margrie remarked. “Despite exploring only a small fraction of vestibular stimulus space, almost all cells were found to respond.”Why the world looks stable while we move (Medical Xpress). A related article concerns experiments at the University of Tübingen to explore head-eye coordination. The world does not appear to roll or bounce, even when we run or walk with a bobbing motion. Video cameras catch the bouncing, as photographers know, even when using a gimbal. The brain, however, “corrects for any changes in visual information caused by head movements.” The brain can be tricked, though; “when visual stimuli and our perception of movement do not fit together, this balancing act in the brain falls apart.” Users of virtual reality headsets know the feeling; it can lead to motion sickness. The researchers are only on the verge of being able to understand how the brain corrects for the input errors from the senses. However it works, it appears to be a matter of software (programmed response), not hardware (neurons).Where did that noise come from? (Science Daily). Research at the Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich augments the above findings about sense perception. With our two ears, we have the ability to use parallax to locate the source of sounds. Experience helps us with familiar sounds, such as a baby’s cry or an ambulance, but what does the brain do with unfamiliar sounds? Are wec hearing a faint sound close by or a louder sound further away? The body’s response, which can be improved by training, is to move the head.Wiegrebe and his team set out to determine how our hearing system copes with this situation. The experiments were carried out in a non-reverberant chamber to ensure that the participants could not assess relative distances from the locations of sounds on the basis of echoes or reverberation. The experimental subjects wore blindfolding goggles and their head motions were monitored. They were seated facing two sound sources that could be positioned at different distances from the subject. One of the sources, chosen at random, emitted high-pitched and the other low-pitched sounds. The subjects’ task was to determine which of the sound sources was closer to them. “Participants who moved their upper bodies sideways — so that the sound sources were further to the right and then further to the left — were better able to estimate the distance between the sound sources. This result demonstrates that humans can use auditory motion parallax to estimate relative distances from sound sources,” Wiegrebe points out. In fact, subjects were able to do so even when the distance difference between the two sound sources was only 16 cm.How would the brain process alien music? (Science Daily). Speaking of unfamiliar sounds, how would the brain process alien music? A researcher at the Max Planck Institute created computer-composed mathematical sequences of tones to find out. Knowing that a region of the left brain above the temple (Broca’s area) was responsible for processing language, he hypothesized that a corresponding area in the right brain would process music. Musicians were invited to listen to the sequences made up of “randomly generated combinations of tone-triplets that were combined in a palindrome-like manner,” and determine which ones contained musical grammar that made sense. Sure enough, the right side that corresponds to Broca’s area was activated in MRI scans during the tests. “This suggests the task [of determining musical grammar] is accomplished through the integration of information in memory with some form of neural computation of the musical grammar in the right homologue of Broca’s area.”Space radiation more hazardous: Implications for astronauts and satellites (Science Daily). In the mind-body problem, all agree that the physical brain influences thoughts. The monist reduces thought to the physical brain, denying the separate existence of the mind.  The dualist acknowledges both, while accepting that they interact in complex ways. This news item coming from the University of New Hampshire’s Space Science Center warns that space radiation is “much higher than thought,” with implications for astronaut safety: “Unshielded astronauts could experience acute effects like radiation sickness or more serious long-term health issues like cancer and organ damage, including to the heart, brain, and central nervous system.” Previous studies have shown that extended travel beyond earth’s safety shields (magnetic field and atmosphere) could lead to dementia (6 Jan 2013). Does this demonstrate that the mind is merely the brain? Not necessarily. To even ask the question, one must assume a “self” that understands the question and can contemplate answers that can endure even when brain cells are replaced. As for free will, Professor Alan Charles Kors demonstrated the problem in his course The Birth of the Modern Mind by merely commanding his arm to raise and doing it against the force of gravity. Then he could make his body disobey his mind by commanding it to rise up but making it move down. None of the above news articles are likely to help the materialist/monist view.Update 3/19/18: After this article was published, National Geographic posted an article, “Why the Brain-Body Connection Is More Important Than We Think” that is very much on topic. In a Book Talk piece, Simon Worrall interviews Alan Jasanoff, author of The Biological Mind. Jasanoff, a professor of biological engineering at MIT, denies dualism, relegating the soul to a reflection of biological activity not only of the brain itself, but of the whole body’s responses to internal and external environmental inputs. He describes his main point:This book is largely about two opposite ideas: the biological mind centered on the brain, in which influences from the rest of the body and outside the body shape what we think and do, and the cerebral mystique, a complex of stereotypes and ideals about the brain, which tend to treat it as an isolated and all-powerful entity, almost like a modern version of the soul.The problem with having a dualistic view of the brain and its relationship to the physical body, and the physical world, is that it makes us see ourselves as unnaturally self-contained, both as minds and as autonomous agents. In other words, we view ourselves as things that operate from within, so we’re less sensitive to things that influence us on the outside.There’s no question that our minds are influenced by inside and outside influences, including temperature, light and our own gut biota. But his explanation undercuts itself. We would have to conclude that Jasanoff is not an autonomous agent making rational statements he believes to be true about the brain. His words reduce to “mere” responses to environmental influences. He debases ‘mystical’ views, but then says, “The brain is a biotic organ, embedded in a continuum of natural causes and connections that together contribute to our biological minds.” How is his view of the mind not mystical itself? How does a biotic lump of tissue, subject to natural causes and connections, give rise to a mind capable of striving for truth with any credibility? He says in the concluding paragraph,My overarching theme is against narrow thinking. If we want to solve our problems, we shouldn’t reduce them to problems of the brain. We need to keep a broad view, which recognizes how the brain is connected both to the body and to the environment; and look for solutions wherever they happen to lie. Explaining human behavior in terms of brain function alone stems from a kind of mystical view of the brain and keeps us from advancing in a way that science can encourage us.Look at all the ‘should’ and ‘need’ words there. Is narrow thinking bad? Is a broad view good? How does a biotic brain decide that? How does a biological mind know that explaining things or finding solutions are mental activities worth striving for? His materialistic Pandora’s box has just let loose a swarm of questions about morality.Neurosurgeon Michael Egnor has written on the mind-body problem numerous times at Evolution News & Science Today. Readers will find it instructive to hear his arguments for dualism, such as “The Representation Problem and the Immaterialism of the Mind” (ENST 5 Feb 2018), “Free Will Denial and PreCrimes” (ENST 1 Feb 2018), “Naturalism and Self-Refutation” (ENST 31 Jan 2018) and others (search on his name on the front page under “Writers”). He also has spoken on the ID the Future podcast several times. Another author on the mind-body problem at ENST is Denyse O’Leary, co-author of The Spiritual Brain. A video interview by Lawrence Kuhn with philosopher David Chalmers on ENST is well worth reviewing (ENST 24 Aug 2012).Another good thinker on the mind-body problem and the necessity of reason and the validity of thought is C.S. Lewis. I recommend his essays “De Futilitate” and “The Poison of Subjectivism” in Christian Reflections for his own exposition of the argument from reason. The Discovery Institute’s book The Magician’s Twin has good essays expounding on Lewis’s views. See also the videos on the C. S. Lewis Channel on YouTube.Creation-Evolution Headlines has also written about the mind-body problem over the years, in articles such as “Who’s in Control: Your Brain or You?” (12 March 2010), “Let Your Mind Marvel at Its Brain” (5 Aug 2016), “You Are Free to Read This” (18 Sept 2016), and others (search on “Mind-Body Problem” in the search bar).(Visited 710 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Rohit leads MI to six-wicket win over KKR

first_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL IPL 2016 × Published on Rohit Sharma of Mumbai Indians plays a shot during the IPL cricket match at Eden Gardens, in Kolkata, on Wednesday. – Photo: K.R. Deepak Skipper Rohit Sharma led from the front with a sparkling 84 as an inspired Mumbai Indians cruised to a six-wicket victory over Kolkata Knight Riders to open their account in the ninth season of Indian Premier League here today.Chasing a challenging target of 188 in the T20 match, Jos Buttler made the chase look easier, smashing his way to 41 off mere 22 balls and helped Mumbai Indians chase down the target with five balls to spare at the Eden Gardens.Having stayed till the end, Sharma got his runs off just 54 balls, hitting 10 fours and two sixes in the process.At a venue where he has scored centuries in the all three formats beside his epic ODI world record 264, Sharma did not put a wrong foot and looked in imperious form since kick-starting with a third ball six against Andre Russell.Gambhir struggled to contain Sharma as he dissected the field with ease while the likes of Buttler (3×4, 3×6) and Mitchell McClenaghan (20 from eight balls; 3×6) put on useful partnerships.There was a time when Mumbai Indians were in a spot with 101 required from 59 balls as KKR kept on attacking with their spin strategy.In a tactical masterstroke, MI’s think-tank promoted the left-handed New Zealand all-rounder McClenaghan who turned it around with two successive sixes against Chawla and followed that up with another slog over midwicket against rookie Kuldeep Yadav.The cameo brought the required run-rate down and calmed Sharma’s nerves and he also found fine support from Englishman Buttler who hit Russell for two sixes and one four in a 18-run 16th over to inch closer to the target.After Buttler’s departure in the third ball of the penultimate over, Sharma hit Russell for three boundaries in succession to make it one from the last over, a formality Kieron Pollard completed to bring the defending champions’ campaign back on track.With six away games awaiting them, it’s a disappointing loss for Kolkata Knight Riders, who surprised by preferring young Indian chinaman Kuldeep Yadav over ace spinner Sunil Narine, who joined the squad yesterday and was rested.Earlier, half centuries from skipper Gautam Gambhir and Manish Pandey lifted Kolkata Knight Riders to 187 for five.Gambhir led by example with 64 from 52 balls (4×4, 1×6) and the skipper got fine support from talented youngster Pandey, who scored a rollicking 52 from 29 balls, to get the momentum going with a 100-run partnership from just 60 balls. SHAREcenter_img COMMENT sport April 14, 2016 Rohit Sharma of Mumbai Indians plays a shot during the IPL cricket match at Eden Gardens, in Kolkata, on Wednesday. – Photo: K.R. Deepak COMMENTSlast_img read more

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